A Complete Guide to Renting an Apartment in Poland for Foreigners

Leaving the family home can be quite a challenge, especially if we are talking about moving to another country. Renting a flat or a room is a long and complex process that requires a lot of patience and at least some basic knowledge. Where to look for a flat? What should I pay attention to when searching for an accommodation? What conditions do you have to meet according to Polish law? What kind of contract should you sign? All these questions will be answered in this publication, so sit back and relax, because you are in for a lot of new information.

First flat in Poland – where to start?

Wondering where to start the search for your first rental flat? Here are some of the most important things you should consider at the start of your journey to find your dream flat.

Budget
To begin with, you need to determine the budget you can commit to renting a flat. Remember that when you sign a contract, you are committing to paying the agreed amount until the end of the contract. On top of this, you will most likely have to pay a deposit, the purpose of which is to secure funds in the event of late payments or damage to furnishings. The deposit usually amounts to the value of one month’s commitment, but in the case of higher-standard premises, this amount can be as much as three times the deposit. You should also be aware that the amount listed in the advertisements usually refers only to the rent for the landlord, so you will have to add the cost of utilities and sometimes the co-op rent. Therefore, think carefully about your financial possibilities before you sign a tenancy agreement.

Requirements
Be sure to make the agreement you sign understandable to you. If necessary, have it translated into your language. The next step to renting a flat is to define your requirements in detail. To do this, it is best if you answer the following questions:

  1. Do I want to rent a room or a whole flat?
  2. How much am I able to pay per month for accommodation?
  3. How many rooms do I need/how big a room do I want to rent?
  4. What location do I prefer?
  5. What floor do I want to live on?
  6. What additional facilities do I need (bath, balcony, garden, cellar, attic)?
  7. Do I want to rent alone or share a flat?
  8. For what period do I want to sign a contract?
  9. Do I want to live in a furnished flat or not?
  10. Do I want to look for accommodation on my own or use an intermediary?


If you answer all these questions before you start looking for your new nest, you will definitely make the process more pleasant.

Renting a flat by a foreigner in Poland

A non-resident who intends to stay in Poland for more than one month (in the case of an EU citizen – 3 months), but does not wish to stay permanently, should be registered for temporary residence in a specific place. A registration of residence is a legal-administrative obligation still in force in our country. It applies to everyone who lives in Poland. A foreigner who is not a citizen of a European Union member state, a citizen of a member state of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) – a party to the agreement on the European Economic Area or a citizen of the Swiss Confederation who does not fulfil their obligation to register is subject to a fine.

Registration in rented accommodation

A foreigner renting a flat in Poland does not have to ask the flat owner for permission to register. They can do it on their own. EU and EFTA citizens and their family members have the option to arrange this online. Others have to go directly to their municipality to register.
A foreigner must take with them documents confirming identity and the right to reside in Poland, as well as a completed temporary residence registration form and a document confirming the right to premises. Such a document is, inter alia, a tenancy agreement.

Renting a flat in Poland

Renting flats to foreigners is already an everyday occurrence on the Polish rental market, but it can be a long and tiring process, especially if one of the parties does not speak Polish. That is why it is often worth using intermediaries such as Little Home.